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Client: 
RVO - Fonds Duurzaam Water
Project start: 
June-2013
Project end: 
May-2018

FINISH in Kenya

The concept that financial inclusion improves sanitation and health (FINISH) has been field tested in India for the last 4 years, whereby sanitation and health awareness has been raised for an estimated 3 million people, and well over one million people have been financially included. Also 160,000 safe sanitation systems have been constructed and are used through financial inclusion. This Public Private Partnership has crossed the Indian Ocean. The first African country where it will be implemented is Kenya (FINISH INK) subsidized by the Sustainable Water Fund (part of Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Netherlands).

What we do

The concept that financial inclusion improves sanitation and health (FINISH) has been field tested in India for the last 4 years, whereby sanitation and health awareness has been raised for an estimated 3 million people, and well over one million people have been financially included. Also 160,000 safe sanitation systems have been constructed and are used through financial inclusion.

Project purpose

The purpose of the intervention is improved livelihood opportunities of marginalized communities by uplifting their health potential. This is done by decreasing prevalence of sanitation related diseases through improved sanitation facilities, as a result of increased demand and financial inclusion.

How we do it

Project intervention

The consortium is going to implement an intervention that creates an adequate environment for a local-market-based approach to sanitation services in Kilifi and Busia county in Kenya. Its vision is to achieve improved health status in Kenya by sustainably expanding access to and demand for sanitation facilities through financial inclusion. This project addresses the social and economic determinants of sanitation by creating demand through the so-called CLTS approach and providing sanitation loans (a microcredit for sanitation) to those households currently deprived of improved sanitation facilities.

Project results

By the end of this project, the partnership will have achieved the following results:

  1. 840,000 people are aware of the importance of proper sanitation;
  2. 40,000 households will have improved sanitation facilities (i.e. 280,000 people with safe sanitation) and thus increased economic potential;
  3. At least 50 sanitation enterprises will have been formed through increased demand for sanitation;
  4. 80,000 women will be empowered;
  5. 280,000 people will be financially included, including the all important financial literacy;
  6. At least 2 MFIs will have a sanitation loan in their portfolio;
  7. 10,000 people will have sanitation livelihood opportunities. On the long term, sanitation loan products will be an integral part of the micro financing market.

The project results in increased health status of the targeted communities, which leads to increased development indicators and contributes to sustainable economic growth.

Project location

Kilifi and Busia County, Kenya

During the week of 12-18 May 2013 a number of field visits and interactions were held in Kilifi County. Detailed discussions were held savings and credit groups of our micro-finance partners, KWFT and K-REP. We also met a number of individuals who had made tremendous economic progress since their first micro loan. An interactive session with those responsible at the Kilifi County level for public health, all showed us that we are on the same page with financial inclusion being related to sanitation and health.

Several beneficiaries we met confirmed that sanitation is an issue, but perhaps not their most important one, as they are mostly living in rented houses. However in their traditional homesteads very few have any sanitation facilities. Sanitation in their current mostly urban settings, may require a different approach, i.e. sanitation system construction in peri-urban areas and focus on emptying (supporting entrepreneurs) and safe disposal / reuse.

The awareness and demand generation methods are expected to differ little though. A second major issue is that few know how much a system costs and mostly shoddy work is done by those few who construct sanitation systems. Thus emphasis will need to be on identifying and training artisans. In the very positive and interactive meeting with district health officials it was confirmed that the focus is on dry sanitation.

At the Amref Country Office, Nairobi, we had a one-and-a-half day first programme management board meeting. It was attended by all local partners, SNS-REAAL, UNU-MERIT, Amref Netherlands and WASTE (chair). The discussions were cordial. In a very pleasant atmosphere a lot of ground was covered such as the standard operating procedures for its functioning was approved. A basic agreement was reached on the profile of the programme coordinator. The scope of the impact study was outlined by UNU and its practical implications were widely shared.

A sanitation demand generation move was shared and regarded as being very valuable, provided few small changes are made. It will be released on the next programme management board meeting in Busia on 10 September. The official launch of the programme will also take place in Busia (11 September), later to be followed by Kilifi. An evening launch already took place in Nairobi. Separate meetings were held with private sanitation enterprises and the scope for linking sanitation demand measures of FINISH INK with the supply side stimulus of WSP and IFC is promising.

Thus the conditions are all set for FINISH INK to take off.

Partners

WASTE, AMREF, Kenyan Ministry of Health (previously known as the Ministry of Public Health and Sanitation), KWFT, K-Rep, SNS Asset Management, Goodwell Investments, Social Equity Foundation and the United Nations University, Maastricht UNU-MERIT.